Dr. Ron Choong is an interdisciplinary scholar. He studied law, the natural sciences, international relations, philosophy and religion.

After reading law at the University of London and astronomy at the Open University, he earned an STM at Yale University in history and philosophy. At Princeton Seminary he earned a ThM in the philosophy of science as well as a PhD in science and theology with a dissertation on "Neuroscience, Nolition and Kenosis in Moral Cognition”. 

Ron’s current research interests include the implications of paleoanthropology and cognitive neuroscience for the emergence of religion. He undertakes field research expeditions in Africa, the Middle East and Asia to trace the geohistory of religious thought in tandem with advances in science, technology and medicine.


BFM 89.9: The Business Station

Religions Along the Silk Road

Radio interview with Dr. Ron Choong, Principal Investigator,

Center for Interdisciplinary Research

February 23, 2017

 

http://www.bfm.my/silk-road-religions-ron-choong.html


2014, SUDAN: At the pyramid fields of Meroe, investigating the location of the Black Pharaohs of the 25th Dynasty.

2015, INDONESIA: Examining Liang Bua Satu (LB1) "Hobbit" at the National Center for Archaeology.

2015, INDONESIA: Examining Liang Bua Satu (LB1) "Hobbit" at the National Center for Archaeology.

2012, SPAIN: At the Atapuerca archaeological site where the oldest known European human fossils,  Homo intercessor,  dating back to 1 million years ago were discovered.

2012, SPAIN: At the Atapuerca archaeological site where the oldest known European human fossils, Homo intercessor, dating back to 1 million years ago were discovered.

2011, SOUTH AFRICA: With Dr Ron Clarke to examine his discovery of Australopithecus prometheus or "Little Foot"still in situ, at the Sterkfontein caves. Embedded in rock, the skeleton took 15 years to recover. In 2015, it was dated to 3.67 million years old and the footbones provided evidence of bipedalism (walking on two legs).

2011, SOUTH AFRICA: With Dr Ron Clarke to examine his discovery of Australopithecus prometheus or "Little Foot"still in situ, at the Sterkfontein caves. Embedded in rock, the skeleton took 15 years to recover. In 2015, it was dated to 3.67 million years old and the footbones provided evidence of bipedalism (walking on two legs).

2011, TANZANIA: At Oldupia Gorge where  Homo habilis  was discovered, with Dr Don Johanson

2011, TANZANIA: At Oldupia Gorge where Homo habilis was discovered, with Dr Don Johanson